Tag Archives: C-Suite

CFOs in the Spotlight

I’ve been getting a lot of e-mails from Proformative.com reminding me of the CFO Dimensions conference, held this year in New York City in Mid October and targeted at senior finance professionals from many industries. The focus of this year’s event, as listed on the Proformative.com website was: “The evolving role of technology and leadership in finance”, with the theme of this conference being “The CFO as Chief Future Officer”.

I didn’t plan on attending this event but can imagine that a good portion of the discussions was centered on why and how CFOs should pay careful attention to available data, using analytics, in order to arrive at reasonably accurate and reliable predictions of the future financial health of their organizations.

CFO Dimensions is just one recent example. There are many more activities, seminars, webinars, white papers and other information, mostly contributed through the Internet, informing readers of the important role CFOs have in leading their financial organizations and in partnering with their organizations’ CEOs and other executive management members, helping their companies navigate their charted course, at times through rough waters, but with confidence and decisiveness, only possible with access to and proper interpretation of reliable data.

I’ve been in finance and accounting for a long time now and don’t remember the use of the CFO title when I first started. In fact, none of the C-Suite titles, as they are known today, existed.  I was recently amused to learn about a technology company that had, in addition to its CEO, CFO, CTO, CIO and COO, also a Chief Talent Officer. I assume this is the head of Human Resources but not sure if it is also abbreviated CTO, or maybe CTO2?. The company also had a Chief Digital Officer (the Analog days must be over for good).

I suppose these C-Suite titles are only limited to one’s imagination, but there is an important message here: The creation of specific and defined organizational leadership roles in certain areas where the organization’s excellence as a whole is the combination of the levels of excellence of each of these areas with the “Chief” in charge defining and maintaining that excellence. The CFO’s office is such an area, arguably one of the most important in any organization.

I’ve been writing about the changing CFO role on this blog for a while now. The entries titled “CFO’s Revised Job Description“, “The Ideal CFO Skills”, “The CFO’s Big Picture” and “Why CFOs Need to Adopt Financial Analytics” are good examples and are reflections of the gradual change of the role from purely accounting to everything finance, accounting, reporting, legal and compliance. To that add HR and IT which also are starting to become the responsibility of the CFO and you’ll begin to realize how much a company is dependent on its CFO, his or her skills, experience and attitude toward the job.

As seen by our readers in prior blog entries, there is one area that CFOs must pay close attention to and do it continually and consistently: Analytics.

The information technology has advanced to a point that any data generated by the organization, in any areas of operation, plus all the data generated through the execution of a strategic plan, an operational plan and a budget, plus re-forecasting of that budget data, is available to be presented to the CFO in exactly the format and presentation style he or she desires. Now the CFO can have insight into past, present and the anticipated future performance of the company, and with that, also into the future financial health of the organization.

Modern day software solutions can provide such insight. Budget Maestro‘s Analytics solution, Analytics Maestro is such an application. By using and relying on such a solution, CFOs will certainly be in the spotlight.