Tag Archives: Budgeting Best Practices

Budgeting Best Practices Just Got Better

What is missing from traditional “Best Practices” and how to change that

 I recently read an article by Barry Wilderman on SearchFinancialApplications.com (which is part of TechTarget.com) titled “Buying Software? Budgeting best practices come first”.  The entire article is available here. If you are not already a member you will need to register for this free site which encompasses many areas of technology and finance.

In this article the author focuses on the need to establish a budget process that borrows from best practices in this area of finance. The points given in the article are valuable and useful, however, there are a couple more critical areas that when observed and practiced will greatly complement this set of budgeting process best practices.

The most important aspect of the budget process is the usefulness and application of the budget with its analytics results in steering the company on its planned course. I’ve seen more than several organizations, some fairly large, where decisions were not supported by solid data; this data simply didn’t exist or was inaccurate or incomplete. Managements were often forced to use their experience, best estimates, intuition or perhaps no logic at all. Some of these decisions resulted in serious judgment errors with severe consequences to these companies.

We all read about companies who miss analysts’ estimates or come short of their own expectations. Some of the poor financial results are due to bad or inadequate planning, some due to unanticipated changes in the economy or customer demand, and some to historical poor analysis of actual company performance as compared with forecasted performance.

One of the most critical “Budgeting Best Practices” should include a complete and accurate forecasted Balance Sheet and Statement of Cash flows, without which management can’t make a fair assessment of the future financial health of the company.  Another is an analytics process that uses historical, current and budget data and displays the results in a manner allowing managers to quickly see and understand the data. I have already discussed these concepts several times on this blog in such entries as: Why you Must Forecast your Balance Sheet, Part 1 and Part 2, Why CFOs Need to Adopt Financial Analytics.

I agree with the points conveyed in the TechTarget article mentioned above but regardless of how well thought out and executed your budgeting process is you must make sure that these “Best Practices” and the actual software application you use are able to assist management in gaining insight into the future financial health of the company and in making the right decisions timely and with confidence.